Camille Koué
Growing up in Oakland, California filled me with a desire to learn how to improve communities. Spending the majority of my adult life educating myself in Washington, D.C. has given me the tools to be able to do just this.

My undergraduate education at American University allowed me to combine passions. By majoring in Visual Media and minoring in Justice, I was able to study the impact that communications and visual art can have on people and communities, by bringing important topics to the forefront of conversation and uniting people around a common cause.

This desire to educate the public led me to The Commonwealth Club of California, where I worked as Program Coordinator, producing speaking events for the public with thought leaders from around the globe, on topics relating to health, politics, food, art, love, philosophy, literature and culture, to name a few. This experience piqued my interest in the power of technology and its ability to connect people with one another and connect the public with their government.

This new interest led me to the Communication, Culture and Technology graduate program at Georgetown University. At Georgetown, I am studying how to implement creative uses of technology in local, state, and federal governments that facilitate the engagement and participation of people in government, policy, and democracy.

My current work at both the Women's Institute for a Secure Retirement and the National Political Science Honor Society has given me a particular interest in the status of women in this country. I am learning about some of the unique challenges the women face, and the need for these challenges to be addressed by more women entering into politics.

Government provides a wonderful platform for bringing technology, democracy, and people together. I want to use technology to improve public engagement in government and policy development, as a way to reconnect and strengthen communities. And I want to help shape policy decisions that are more sensitive to the unique needs of women by supporting the growth of women in politics.
www.camillekoue.com   

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Andy
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Recent Activity

Camille Koué

@Alan, here is an article with links to some of its online components. www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/b...

And here is a TED talk about it tedxtalks.ted.com/video/TEDxRe...

I haven't found any articles about its shortcomings but I would love to read about them. I'll keep searching and please let me know if you come across one.

Thumbe62afbfbd7cd3257ccf45f73ba5da08f

Iceland crowdsources its next constitution

Iceland is crowdsourcing its new constitution to citizens through social media.

www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/b...

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Posted Jul 31, 2012
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Camille Koué

There is this building right by the lake that I used to walk past all the time. It is very tall, but the sides don't have any windows, so it is just like 40 stories of a concrete, grey wall. I always wanted those two sides of the building to be covered in a huge painting or mural. I would love for the city to commission something for that space.

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Posted Jun 25, 2012
Andy
Andy
Aug 25, 2013

What building are we talking about here, Camille?

Posted by Andy on Aug 25, 2013
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Camille Koué

I'm studying this in graduate school right now, and hoping to focus on an integrated system (hopefully in Oakland) for my thesis, so maybe I can work with you and Code for America/Code for Oakland on my thesis project, when the time comes.

Do you know of cities that have integrated systems?

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Posted Jun 25, 2012
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Camille Koué

The best integrated system I know of is not in a city or in the United States, but in Iceland. Where they combined physical meetings with social media and open source websites to increase transparency and public collaboration – while rewriting their constitution. They were very successful in public participation – of course they have one of the highest percentages of Internet literacy in the world, as I understand it. But I think that is a good model to look at. I am not aware of cities that have implemented integrated systems, but I would certainly love to learn about them, if you know of any! I only know about cities that have implemented a social media page, or a mobile app, or some politicians (Issa and the Project Madison) or government agencies (USPTO’s Peer-to-Patent project) that have created open source websites to encourage public participation. But those systems are compartmentalized and not integrated.

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Posted Jun 25, 2012
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