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Carissa Tomlinson

40 neighbors want the city to implement more actual bike lanes instead of sharrows in Baltimore.

A shared-lane marking or "sharrow" is a bike lane marking painted on the street. This marking is placed in the center of a travel lane to indicate that a bicyclist may use the full lane. The name sharrow was coined by Oliver Gajda, of the City and County of San Francisco Bicycle Program, and is a portmanteau of share and arrow.

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Christina Bradley
Liam
Philip Lacombe
ARTblocks Baltimore
Natalie
Alice Wessendorf
Crosby Marketing
Graham Coreil-Allen
David Troy
Elizabeth Eadie
Baltimore Slumlord Watch
Deborah Patterson
Tom Hickey
Teresa
Max
Elizabeth Jones
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The Near Miss Project
Monday, June 19, 2017, 12:00pm - 1pm ET
Webinar

Fear of being hit and seriously injured by a car is a major deterrent for people considering whether to bike on city streets. At the same time, city transportation departments use historical crash data to prioritize street design projects where people have been killed and seriously injured. But new research shows that for cyclists, near misses, close calls, and aggressive behavior from other road users can also have a significant effect on people’s biking behaviors or even their decision to ride at all. How can data about these cycling near-misses better inform city transportation policy and street design?

Join NACTO for a conversation with Dr. Rachel Aldred, founder of the UK’s Near Miss Project, to learn how her research has been used to create cycling policy and design improvements in the UK before injuries occur, and why high-quality design is crucial for increased ridership. Dr. Aldred will touch on various approaches to near miss data collection, and how they can help cities provide a more comfortable biking experience, improve biking rates, and make streets safer for everyone.

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Dan

The Maryland Avenue bike lane was named one of America's best new bike lanes of 2016 :)

"Once the city can add some limbs to this huge 2.6-mile bidirectional trunk between Charles Village and downtown, it'll be building a Baltimore that's significantly easier, cheaper and healthier to get around."

More info: www.bikemore.net/news/maryland...

Source: www.peopleforbikes.org/blog/en...

Thumb3f7a6944b91254f66ad94db2963de494

Maryland Avenue Cycle Track Update

The construction of the 2.6 mile two-way protected bike lane on Maryland
Avenue and Cathedral Streets is now well underway. The two-way lane runs on
the east side of the road along the curb, and will be protected by a
painted buffer with flex-posts and a row of car parking. At intersections
and driveways, green paint striping is used to...

www.bikemore.net/news/maryland...

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Posted Dec 20, 2016
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Dan

"Baltimore transportation officials have proposed a "network of bicycle infrastructure," including the city's first-ever cycletrack. It's a big leap beyond today's incongruent sharrows and paint. The cycletrack will stretch 2.6 miles along Maryland Avenue and Cathedral Street, from Johns Hopkins University in the north to the convention center near the harbor. It will be installed this fall. For the city's bicycle advocates, the network represents a hope that Baltimore may start to build bicycle infrastructure on par with Washington and catapult bicycling forward in the central business district."

Source: greatergreaterwashington.org/p...

Thumb9f9abe3f5041ba61640df2efd5ece92d

Baltimore starts building a real bicycle network

Baltimore transportation officials have proposed a "network of bicycle infrastructure," including the city's first-ever cycletrack. It's a big leap beyond today's incongruent sharrows and paint.

greatergreaterwashington.org/p...

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Posted May 21, 2014
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Carissa Tomlinson

I totally agree! I think more cyclists will feel more comfortable to get on the road if there are designated lanes. I'm from Minneapolis originally, currently #1 bike city in the country and the bike lanes are plentiful. I miss them and the bike culture we had there. I hope it does come to B'more one day.

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Posted Apr 16, 2013
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Cory McCarty

I'll take your word on your experience with the driver distance. I think paint on the pavement does more good than you're giving credit for, but the good definitely isn't as obvious. My understanding is that the single best thing for safety is simply getting more cyclists on the road so drivers are more accustomed to having them around. I'm in favor of anything that will achieve that.

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Posted Apr 16, 2013
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Carissa Tomlinson

I just don't see the point of sharrows. They are just paint of a street that cars don't even notice. They give cyclists no more room and cars do not know that bikes have the right to be there. Ideally, we'd have the bike lanes on the sidewalk side of parked cars therefore giving us a car barrier in between. If that's not possible I'll take a bike lane over a sharrow anyday. Cars can see there is a bike lane, they aren't even aware of what a sharrow is. Having ridden in both, I am much further from cars when riding in a bike lane which gives me more of a sense of safety.

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Posted Apr 16, 2013
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Cory McCarty

It's an advantage if it improves safety. But if they're just three-foot lanes adjacent to traffic lanes, and if drivers actually drive closer to the cyclists because they figure they can drive right against the line (which the research seems to suggest), they probably don't actually improve safety.

Would it be better to turn existing sharrows into bike lanes, or to create more sharrows (which get drivers thinking about cyclists which does improve safety) and bike lanes on new streets?

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Posted Apr 16, 2013
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Carissa Tomlinson

Bike lanes are a designated space for a bicycle, sharrows mean you have to share the road. That is the advantage.

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Posted Apr 16, 2013
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Cory McCarty

What would be the advantage of bike lanes over sharrows? As I understand it, the research indicates that there is no particular safety improvement to a designated bike lane over a sharrow if the bike lane is adjacent to a traffic lane, and there may even be a reduction in safety (drivers think they can drive right on the line even if there is a bike there). Separated bike lanes might be an improvement, but they are far more expensive and I don't think I've seen any of those in Baltimore.

I would love to see anything that makes Baltimore more bikeable or walkable! I just think it would be useful to understand the benefits of this request over what we already have.

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Posted Apr 16, 2013
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Graham Coreil-Allen

One thing I noticed is that motorists in the Waverly/Abel area frequently yield to me when I'm on my bike. I wonder why traffic culture is different in this area?

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Posted Sep 18, 2012
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