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Ryan Benedetto Shedd

29 neighbors want complete streets for all users, pedestrians, cyclists, and cars alike in Miami.

Ryan Benedetto Shedd
When people have options and begin to use every mode of transport, every mode of transport becomes more efficient! Want to fix Miami's traffic problem? Fix its walking, biking, and transit problem!

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Elsa Roberts
And_Ampersand
Collin Worth
Leah Weston
Maxwell K
Townhouse Center
AllianceMIA
Nicole Hess
Dan
Alan Joseph Williams
Tom K.
Meli
Mark V. McDonnell
Wallace Bray
Thaddaeus Elliott
Christine Florez

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Dan

From Streetsblog:

"Architect and avid cyclist Bernard Zyscovich has proposed such an infrastructure upgrade in Miami-Dade, Florida that would convert a killer expressway into a cycle super highway.

Rickenbacker Causeway — linking Miami to Key Biscayne — currently holds three car lanes in each direction, but Zyscovich’s plan would convert the divided highway to two lanes for automobile traffic and a landscape-buffered lane for cyclists and pedestrians. Hardwood trees and bushes that would be planted along the cycle track would increase safety by separating the various modes of transportation.

Zyscovich suggested a preliminary project using plastic poles to separate the lanes, which mimics a plan implemented on I-95. The full project proposal would cost approximately $20 to $30 million along the entire stretch of Rickenbacker Causeway, however, there is currently no official backing for the project."

streetsblog.net/2014/07/15/fix...

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Tom K.

Really helpful article about problems Cleveland is having implementing and executing their 'complete streets' policy:

Having good city staff — people who are committed to seeing complete streets implemented and understand why it’s important — is crucial. Or, like Charlotte, you can develop and train a working group or committee to oversee the process.

“You have a lot of people that have been around for years that are used to doing things the way they have been doing them,” Seskin said. “You have to change the problem and make them understand they’re solving for a new problem.”

dc.streetsblog.org/2013/07/11/...

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Tom K.

Good article about pedestrian-oriented shopping streets (POSS)

"Much of the potential for POSS to endure ongoing success depends on five strategic principles: first, they have to be readily and easily accessible from, or mixed with, high density residential areas, office buildings, and other businesses and places of work; secondly, they have to be extremely well connected to, and served by, the public transportation system; thirdly, they have to be strategically interconnected with the city's pedestrian system and bicycle routes; fourthly, they have to offer convenient bicycle parking facilities at key access points along the POSS, and/or bicycle services that allow bikers to either bike back to their original point of arrival, or between the parking facilities provided, particularly when the POSS are very long; and fifthly, they have to be planned, designed and managed on an ongoing basis for success."

bit.ly/15ndg4A

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Patrick Nichols

Miami Beach is attempting to create some type of infrastructure; however, its too little and rather un-intuitive. Rather than paying engineers to design these things, they should be reaching out to the community that rides the streets everyday. We know what we need, how could they?

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Ryan Benedetto Shedd

I agree! But where buses are functioning efficiently (or as efficiently as they can, given infrastructure) they should be included in street rehab.

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And_Ampersand

I agree, however there have been some unexpected shortfalls in bus expansions. There's a compelling story on the 82 route, for instance, which was meant to expand the infrastructure using the half-cent tax (I just wrote a paper on this, so I'm a little obsessive...). Though we expanded our lines, the route is a flop: www.miamiherald.com/multimedia.... Bottom line, the buses are a short term fix on a car-filled infrastructure. Train lines are a little more sustainable, kinder to congestion, and encourage Miamians to get out off the roads to diversify their transit.

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