Dinah Sanders

Dinah Sanders


Currently self-employed as a writer, I hold degrees in History and Library Science. I put these skills to work on cocktail history and taxonomy in The Art of the Shim: Low-Alcohol Cocktails to Keep You Level and on the Bibulo.us blog. My first book, Discardia: More Life, Less Stuff, explored letting go of what doesn’t make life awesome.

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Office of the City Administrator
Ryan Freitas

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Michael Nulty
Tom K.
Мартин Стојчевски
Eckhart Beatty
Andy
Tyler
Dan
Shawn K. Quinn
Adriana
Laura Gluhanich
Neighborland

Recent Activity

Dinah Sanders

Please also see:
The Surgeon General and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) position www.publichealthreports.org/do...

Community Preventive Services Task Force, an independent, nonfederal, unpaid panel of public health experts, which concluded that research evidence "does not demonstrate that community water fluoridation results in any unwanted health effect other than dental fluorosis" (white spots on teeth)
www.thecommunityguide.org/oral...
In 2011, the CDC proposed a new level for fluoridation — 0.7 parts per million [it was previously 0.7-1.2] — that is expected to reduce the likelihood of fluorosis while continuing to protect teeth from decay.

Scientific Reviews and Reports: Assessing the Evidence (CDC)
www.cdc.gov/fluoridation/safet...

The American Academy of Pediatrics
ilikemyteeth.org/fluoridation/
"A 2010 study examined the issue of fluorosis and infant formula, and reached the conclusion that 'no general recommendations to avoid use of fluoridated water in reconstituting infant formula are warranted.' The researchers examined the condition’s impact on children and concluded that 'the effect of mild fluorosis was not adverse and could even be favorable.'"

Seems like this may be, like measles and whooping cough immunizations, one of those things where a benefit which heavily outweighs its (in this case minor) risks is no longer recognized as a major benefit once it has succeeded in radically reducing a significant health problem. A few generations in, people have forgotten what it was like before.

Dan
Dan
Jun 16, 2015

Thanks Dinah ... a friend from Portland shared these insights as well - www.usatoday.com/story/news/na...

Posted by Dan on Jun 16, 2015
Galen Maloney
Galen Maloney
Jun 23, 2015

Appreciate the links Dinah and your contribution to the debate, but they seem to simply support the standard line of government agencies and mainstream institutions. Changing the way things are being done is never easy and I don't think we should count on our institutions to police themselves and admit to having been mistaken with the fluoride experiment. And I was not able to view the actual studies and methodologies, as the links just gave summaries of the findings. But even if the studies were found to be credible, the best case scenario is that adding fluoride to our water supply is not that harmful But if thats the case, why are we adding this chemical to our drinking supply? Why take the risk? I trust the independence and credibility of the studies showing that fluoride has no significant benefit against tooth decay. But all I am saying is that the people of SF should decide, just like they did in Portland. Let their be a public campaign where the various studies can be vetted and analyzed and we'll let lady liberty and democracy decide.

Posted by Galen Maloney on Jun 23, 2015
Dinah Sanders
Dinah Sanders
Jun 25, 2015

The best case scenario—which is well-supported by a lot of good scientific research that has been repeatedly revisited and found to still be accurate—is that adding fluoride to water supplies radically reduces the incidence of dental caries in people of all ages, without adding significant health risks, and that this reduction in dental issues dramatically alleviates a major source of and contributor to of a wide variety health problems.

Consider the possibility that the reason this is the standard line of government agencies and mainstream institutions is that the findings are solid and that this is a substantial public good.

Seems like you're starting from a position that no scientific findings endorsed by any publicly-funded institutions could possibly be valid.

Posted by Dinah Sanders on Jun 25, 2015
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Dinah Sanders

I had a voicemail message back from Maurice Growney of Livable Streets this morning with good news. The crosswalk is still going in! They've just put the first pedestrian signal pole in there, but are yet to build some of what else is required. (Bulb outs of the curb maybe? A little hard to hear that bit.)

He says, "I apologize for the delay! I've heard it should be a couple of months before we see the work begin in earnest at that intersection and I guess probably another month after that before the signal is operational."

Hooray! And argh, more waiting, but it's happening at last.

Dinah Sanders
Dinah Sanders
Jun 25, 2015

Alas, no progress since. Hoping this gets discussed at tonight's Hayes Valley Neighborhood Association meeting. I will alas not be able to attend.

Posted by Dinah Sanders on Jun 25, 2015
Dan
Dan
Jun 25, 2015

Yikes - so there's no way to track progress on 311 or SeeClickFix?

Posted by Dan on Jun 25, 2015
Dinah Sanders
Dinah Sanders
Jun 26, 2015

Not that I've ever noticed, though I suppose there might be.

Posted by Dinah Sanders on Jun 26, 2015
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Dinah Sanders

Being frustrated on this still not being in place as of February 2015, I asked @SF311 on Twitter, "Hi! Any word on the long-promised NW-SW crosswalk at Fell & Gough? Intersection remains a safety problem." and received this reply:

"No ETA unfortunately. You may want to ask BSM @ 415-554-6920 or Mayor's Office On Disability at 415-554-6789. TY ^JM"

I called that first number and got transferred within BSM, but turns out for crosswalks you want MTA. So, I called 415-701-4500. I was on hold for a while, but with ok jazz in the background, so not awful. :) They suggested I follow up with Maurice Growney and transferred me to his voicemail (his number is 415-701-4549) where I left a message.

I will add another update when I hear back from him. I'm hopeful about his response being useful, if not necessarily good news, as he was so helpful in 2013.

Dan
Dan
Feb 17, 2015

Fair enough ... just let us know if we can help!

Posted by Dan on Feb 17, 2015
Tom K.
Tom K.
Feb 20, 2015

@Dan the mid-block on Brannan I would assume might require a different protocol than the one that's at a light? It'd be interesting to have some sort of informational pow wow to explain the City process of changing anything on our streets. Maybe in cooperation with Walk SF?

Posted by Tom K. on Feb 20, 2015
Dan
Dan
Feb 20, 2015

I'm up for it. I took a look at the Better Streets website and it seems that this lucky fellow is who we should reach out to from SFMTA's Livable Streets program - www.sfmta.com/tom-maguire ... More on Better Streets: www.sfbetterstreets.org/

Posted by Dan on Feb 20, 2015
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Dinah Sanders

Meaning you want places where there is no side-of-street parking for cars? Or places where parking a car is free?

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Dinah Sanders

Perhaps the biggest issue is a lack of public toilets. See also: neighborland.com/ideas/sf-nice...

Lava Mae is going to be providing a small bit of help on this issue with their shower/bathroom buses. www.lavamae.org/
But we need much more.

London has taken a very creative approach which we might want to try here:
news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/en...

See also this past Neighborland posts on this issue:
neighborland.com/ideas/sf-clea...

Dan
Dan
Sep 30, 2014

Thanks Dinah - we'll be mapping many of the existing ideas that apply to this new project from the City Administrator and the CBA companies' project today.

Posted by Dan on Sep 30, 2014
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Dinah Sanders

Any move in this direction needs to take into account those of us who are not tall enough to hold onto a ceiling bar or strap for a bouncy, long BART ride. Adding lots of vertical bars would be one way to solve this.

Also consider how the car with no seats would clearly identify itself from the outside so that those who need seats don't get on and then have to choose between stepping out and missing this train or staying in this car and putting themselves in danger of a fall.

Dinah Sanders
Dinah Sanders
Sep 9, 2014

But isn't that already the car that the bike riders are directed to? Or is that not during the hours you're thinking of?

Anyhow, point is that considering how this gets communicated to potential riders would be an important part of the plan. Certainly there are lots of things, including distinctive exterior paint or decals on the car and signage or painted markings on the platform, which could help people make the best use of the feature.

Posted by Dinah Sanders on Sep 9, 2014
Dennis Hong
Dennis Hong
Sep 11, 2014

That's so funny, carboose. Have not heard that term in years.......That would be wonderful, could use it for the travlers/luggage too. Worse thing about the bikers, is the bikes - derailers grease get all over the seats whne they lean the bikes againist the fabric/soft seats. Besides I think BART needs to rfresh their public handouts, maybe that would be the place to educate how the carboose would be used. At times BART uses these trains for the mainteance workers to haul their cleaning materials around. What an Idea, I'll vote for the carboose. DH

Posted by Dennis Hong on Sep 11, 2014
Nicholas Josefowitz
Nicholas Josefowitz
Oct 28, 2014

Interesting idea. We definitely need to think of how to increase capacity at peak. Do you know if any other transit systems around the country do this?

Posted by Nicholas Josefowitz on Oct 28, 2014
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