Arrowhead Marsh


The neighborhoods in East Oakland have motivated community organizers, and have adopted master plans for San Leandro Creek Trail and Arroyo Villejo, to go along with a strong City-wide resilience plan.  But the challenges of racial inequity are clear.  Between 2003 and 2013, a young black man in Oakland was as likely to be killed in gun violence as he was to be prepped for college.  Our team is committed to a process that recognizes the urgency in that disparity.
 
When we walked Arrowhead Marsh with the community members we heard that getting there was frustrating and unpleasant – there is a strong desire to use the park more. 
 
RELATE  Connecting to the Marsh is at the heart of this approach.  Trails are a physical first step while the community engages in visioning transformational strategies at the bay edge.  Trail connections will connect people to Lake Chabot and the Pacific Crest Trail along the new Eastbay Greenway – making it easy to be healthy with places to walk, bike or visit with friends and family. 
 
ADAPT Adaptation can occur with transfer of development rights and community land trust options supporting development of permanently affordable housing for a mix of incomes, including the missing middle, in mixed-use neighborhoods that include local jobs and access to healthy food.
 
THRIVE  A community-based clean energy microgrid, a decentralized wastewater system and transit accessibility could contribute to more inclusive neighborhoods with shared wealth building.
 
A twenty year vision includes a horizontal levee along the 880 freeway, protecting that essential transportation asset while creating a valuable site for mixed-use, mixed-income housing that supports marine life with muted marshes behind the levee.
 
From day one the San Leandro Creek trail system can be the framework for adapting to upland flooding with rainwater collection along the creek, in neighborhoods and along arterials to slow flooding.  Opportunities to daylight the Arroyo Villejo can be a place to experiment with combining new housing that supports riparian habitat. 
 
Investments to improve the site ecology along trail will be used to leverage additional community benefit such as flood control, economic redevelopment and contamination clean up, while catalyzing development of new healthy, mixed-income housing in this prime transit-accessible priority resilience area in Oakland.

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Arrowhead Marsh

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The Home Team

The Home Team was assembled to explore affordability as a driver of deep transformation, and to leverage multiple benefits that can emerge when a design approach is co-created through the lens of home. Our team’s conceptual approach is rooted in an urban ecology of equitable bioregionalism. We propose re-envisioning our home as interdependent and a contributing component of the Bay’s natural systems for all people who live here. We seek to heal divisions and cultivate solutions, based on shared values, assets and vulnerabilities.

The physical design team is led by Mithun, a San...

The Home Team was assembled to explore affordability as a driver of deep transformation, and to leverage multiple benefits that can emerge when a design approach is co-created through the lens of home. Our team’s conceptual approach is rooted in an urban ecology of equitable bioregionalism. We propose re-envisioning our home as interdependent and a contributing component of the Bay’s natural systems for all people who live here. We seek to heal divisions and cultivate solutions, based on shared values, assets and vulnerabilities.

The physical design team is led by Mithun, a San Francisco- and Seattle-based interdisciplinary design firm of architects, landscape architects, urban designers, urban planners and interior designers. Collaborating team members share local knowledge and the perspective of complex interdependence: Biohabitats, Integral Group, Moffatt & Nichol, HR&A Advisors, Alta Planning + Design, Urban Biofilter and the Resilient Design Institute.

As an important complement to the physical design team members, The Home Team includes Bay Area-based community development corporation Chinatown Community Development Center, as well as the social justice-focused organization, I-SEEED/Streetwyze. These team members bring established local relationships with residents and stakeholders, as well as a multi-layered understanding of issues of affordability and social strife.

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